Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost (2023)

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Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost (1)

Jonathan Blanton

First Assistant Attorney General

Jonathan Blanton is the senior appointed officer to Attorney General Dave Yost and is responsible for overseeing the legal and investigatory work of the office.

Blanton began his career in rural southern Ohio where, after a brief stint in private practice, he spent more than 10 years as the elected prosecuting attorney for Jackson County. In that role, he represented the state of Ohio in cases ranging from speeding violations to aggravated murder and child sex offenses, sometimes within the span of a single day.

In 2011, Blanton joined the Attorney General’s Office as director of the office’s then-new Economic Crimes Unit, a group dedicated to assisting local law enforcement with tracking down and prosecuting scammers, bad contractors and criminal telemarketers. He went on to serve as chief of the office’s Consumer Protection Section from 2014 through 2018 and, from 2019 through July 2022, as deputy attorney general for major litigation.

In the deputy attorney general role, Blanton directed and led some of the office’s highest-profile civil matters, including litigation against a number of opioid manufacturers and pharmaceutical distributors. In 2021, he was recognized by the National Association of Attorneys General (NAAG) for his role in securing settlements that will require four companies to pay a combined $26 billion toward the nation’s fight against the opioid epidemic.

Since joining the Attorney General’s Office, Blanton has served as a subject-matter expert and trainer for NAAG on a variety of topics, including tactics for maximizing the effectiveness of prescription drug monitoring programs, regulating medical professionals, and developing and litigating claims against pharmaceutical supply-chain participants. He has also served as a faculty member for a number of litigation-focused trainings within the Attorney General’s Office and has presented at multiple law enforcement and legal training events on the state and national levels.

Blanton, a graduate of Ohio University and the University of Kentucky College of Law, is admitted to practice in Ohio’s state courts and before the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Ohio, U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Ohio, and federal Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals.

Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost (2)

Benjamin Marrison

Chief of Staff

Benjamin Marrison, chief of staff for Attorney General Dave Yost, is responsible for all non-legal matters, including operations, public policy and communications.

Prior to joining the Attorney General’s Office, Marrison was communications director and senior adviser for Yost at the Auditor of State’s Office during Yost’s second term.

For 16 years, from 1999 to 2015, Marrison was editor of The Columbus Dispatch – the longest-serving editor in the history of the capital-city newspaper. In that role, he oversaw the newsgathering operations, managing the newspaper, its websites and related publications. He was a member of the company’s Board of Directors, Executive Committee and Operating Committee.

Before joining The Dispatch, he worked as the Statehouse bureau chief for The (Cleveland) Plain Dealer and a reporter at The (Toledo) Blade.

Marrison is a graduate of Bowling Green State University. He and his wife, Ellen, have four adult children.

Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost (3)

Shawn Busken

Deputy First Assistant Attorney General and Director of Outside Counsel

Shawn Busken assists the first assistant attorney general with all legal and investigatory work of the Attorney General’s Office, monitors the execution of office decisions and oversees special projects assigned by Attorney General Yost. He also serves simultaneously as director of outside counsel.

From January 2019 through July 2022, Busken served solely as director of outside counsel, managing the engagement, retention and oversight of private-sector attorneys appointed to represent state entities (agencies, colleges, universities, retirement systems, boards and commissions) and to work on securities cases and all other contingency cases. The role involves overseeing approximately 900 matters with 150 firms for more than 60 state clients.

Prior to joining the Attorney General’s Office, Busken worked as policy director for Yost at the Auditor of State’s Office, helping to lead legislative initiatives to require fiscal training for local fiscal officers; reform the charter school process; and prohibit monopolies from being written into the Ohio Constitution.

Before his work in the Auditor’s Office, he spent five years in private practice at Blaugrund, Kessler, Myers & Postalakis, where he practiced labor and employment law. He also served with the Columbus City Prosecutor’s Office.

Busken earned his bachelor’s degree from Brigham Young University and his law degree from The Ohio State University.

(Video) Ohio Lawyer Feature: Attorney General Dave Yost

Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost (4)

Carol O’Brien

Deputy Attorney General for Law Enforcement

Carol O’Brien oversees seven “sections” focused on law enforcement/criminal justice: the Bureau of Criminal Investigation, the Ohio Peace Officer Training Academy, Special Prosecutions, the Ohio Organized Crime Investigations Commission, Health Care Fraud, Crime Victims and Criminal Justice.

Before joining the Attorney General’s Office, O’Brien spent 12 years in the Delaware County Prosecutor’s Office, the last eight as the prosecutor and the previous four as assistant prosecutor. During that time, she also served as a special prosecutor in numerous criminal cases in counties throughout the state.

Earlier in her career, O’Brien served as an assistant attorney general in the Attorney General’s Office and as an assistant prosecutor in the Franklin County Prosecutor’s Office. Prior to those roles, she worked as a staff attorney for the clinical programs within the Ohio State University College of Law, for the Neighborhood Legal Assistance Program and for Advocates for Basic Legal Equality.

In 2016, O’Brien was recognized as Ohio’s Outstanding Prosecuting Attorney for her dedication to justice. She has been an active member of the Ohio Prosecuting Attorneys Association for nearly a decade, serving as president in 2019, and has given presentations on a wide range of prosecutorial matters and other legal topics.

O’Brien has a bachelor’s degree in political science from Northwestern University and a law degree from the University of Toledo. She is licensed to practice in Ohio, South Carolina, the Northern and Southern District Courts of Ohio, the District Court of South Carolina, and the 4th and 6th circuits of the U.S. Court of Appeals.

O’Brien and her husband, Bill, live in Delaware County.

Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost (5)

Jonathan Fulkerson

Deputy Attorney General

(Video) Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost promises 'objective, professional, independent' investigation into J

Jonathan Fulkerson has worked in the Attorney General’s Office for 20 years. In his current role as Deputy Attorney General, he supervises the work of the office’s Health and Human Services, Education, Court of Claims, Public Utilities, Environmental, and Employment sections.

Previously, Fulkerson served in criminal and civil sections within the Attorney General’s Office. He has argued cases in administrative hearings, trial courts and appellate courts. He has argued cases in state and federal courts. He has also spent time in private practice, representing and counseling corporate clients.

Fulkerson is a graduate of American University and Capital Law School. He is a member of the Delaware County Law Library Board and volunteers as a scout leader. He is a counselor for the Law Merit Badge.

Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost (6)

Cynthia C. Dungey

Deputy Attorney General

Formerly a prosecutor in the Health Care Fraud Unit of the Ohio Attorney General’s Office, Cynthia Dungey has rejoined the office as the deputy attorney general responsible for managing the Civil Rights, Labor, PUCO, Taxation, Transportation and Workers’ Compensation sections.

Dungey came to the Attorney General’s Office in 2019 from the Ohio Department of Youth Services, where, as deputy director of Community Engagement and Reentry, she planned for the successful return of youths to their homes and communities.

Prior to that, she served as director of the Ohio Department of Job & Family Services for five years and as the federal designee responsible for supervising the state’s public assistance, workforce development, unemployment insurance, child and adult protective services, adoption, child care, and child support programs.

She previously worked for ODJFS as the chief of staff of Medicaid, managing daily operations and, with a workforce of 500-plus, maintaining 70,000 active providers and issuing multimillion-dollar payments weekly as reimbursement for services to 1.5 million people.

Dungey began her first stint with the Attorney General’s Office in 1996 in the Crime Victims Section, then worked for five years in the Health Care Fraud Section.

In all, Dungey has more than 20 years of experience in administering federally regulated programs, developing and implementing state laws and administrative rules; working with government officials, health care providers and stakeholders to improve delivery systems; and identifying millions in inefficiencies, fraud, waste and abuse in health care, public assistance and other government programs.

Dungey has a bachelor’s degree in political science and sociology from DePauw University, a law degree from the Ohio Northern University College of Law, and an honorary doctorate of community leadership from Franklin University.

Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost (7)

Charles M. Miller

Deputy Attorney General for Major Litigation

Charles Miller manages the Antitrust, Charitable Law, Consumer and Constitutional Offices sections of the Attorney General’s Office, overseeing complex litigation for the state of Ohio. In addition, he personally maintains an active litigation and appeals docket of select cases, including cases involving Google and House Bill 6.

Previously, Miller served as counsel to Attorney General Yost and office counsel, advising and representing the attorney general, the General Assembly, statewide officeholders, as well as universities and other agencies. He also headed the attorney general’s Office of Professional Integrity.

Miller has successfully defended election laws, obtained the return of $40 million in tax subsidies from an automobile manufacturer, secured an agreement with a retail electric company to stop collecting more than $100 million annually in fees from ratepayers, and obtained an injunction against $1.3 billion in subsidies to a nuclear power generator. He also has represented the attorney general in federal courts to defend and vindicate the parens patriae powers of the state.

Before joining the Attorney General’s Office, Miller served as an appellate judge on the Ohio First District Court of Appeals, per the appointment of then-Gov. John Kasich. He spent more than a decade in private practice in Cincinnati focusing on complex litigation, class-action defense and appeals, arguing many cases before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit and the Ohio Supreme Court. Early in his career, he clerked for Justice Maureen O’Connor of the Ohio Supreme Court.

(Video) Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost honors Norton police officers with 'Distinguished Law Valor Award'

Miller served on the Ohio Board of Professional Conduct, the Hamilton County Public Defender Commission, and boards of education for public and charter schools.

He earned his bachelor’s degree in political science from The Ohio State University and his law degree from Boston University.

Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost (8)

Bridget C. Coontz

Chief Counsel and Ethics Officer

Bridget Coontz advises the Attorney General’s Office on legal matters and litigates cases on its behalf. She also advises AGO staff regarding their ethical obligations under Ohio law, the Rules of Professional Conduct, and office policies and procedures. In addition, she supervises the AGO’s Records Management Section, Litigation Support Unit and Law Library.

Before moving into her current role in 2022, Coontz worked in the AGO’s Constitutional Offices Section for nine years, first as assistant chief and then chief. She oversaw and supervised the representation of all public offices established by the Ohio Constitution, including, among others, the Governor’s, Secretary of State’s and Auditor of State’s offices.

Coontz served as lead counsel in state and federal court trials before the Ohio Supreme Court, and in hearings in which she sought and defended against requests for emergency injunctive relief. She has written and orally argued appellate briefs in the U.S. Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals and the Tenth District Court of Appeals of Ohio. She supervised the AGO’s Public Records Unit, which publishes an annual Sunshine Law Manual, provides public-records training throughout the state, responds to public-records requests and litigates public-records cases.

Coontz also previously worked in the AGO’s Special Prosecutions Section and Environmental Enforcement Section, and as counsel for the Ohio State Highway Patrol, representing personnel in federal court and successfully defending against 42 U.S.C. § 1983 claims based on allegations of unlawful arrest and excessive force. She advised and trained troopers on matters regarding civil liability for law enforcement, with a focus on the laws of arrest, search and seizure.

Prior to joining the Attorney General’s Office in 2006, Coontz served from 1999 to 2006 as a Columbus assistant city attorney, representing the city in both criminal and civil matters. As the city’s environmental prosecutor, she helped write the Columbus Nuisance Abatement Code and filed and litigated nuisance actions against problematic properties and their owners.

Coontz earned her bachelor’s degree in criminal justice from Bowling Green State University and her law degree from the Rutgers School of Law.

Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost (9)

Michael Rodgers

Director of Policy and Public Affairs

Michael Rodgers brings more than 15 years of diverse experience in state government to his role as director of policy and public affairs for Attorney General Dave Yost. In leading the Policy and Public Affairs team, he has primary responsibility for all legislative matters at both the state and federal level.

Prior to joining the Ohio Attorney General’s Office, Rodgers served as the chief legal counsel at Opportunities for Ohioans With Disabilities, a deputy legal counsel at the Ohio Department of Natural Resources and the chief legal counsel for the Ohio Department of Agriculture.

He also has served as a legislative liaison and policy analyst for the Ohio Judicial Conference and as a legislative aide for multiple members in the Ohio General Assembly.

Rodgers earned his bachelor’s degree in political science from The Ohio State University, and his law degree from Capital University.

Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost (10)

(Video) Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost announces opioid settlement agreement

Bethany McCorkle

Communications Director

In her role as communications director, Bethany McCorkle manages the day-to-day media interactions for the Attorney General’s Office.

Prior to joining the office, McCorkle was a deputy director at the Ohio Department of Natural Resources, where she oversaw multiple areas, including communications, general services, human resources, information technology law enforcement, and the fiscal and legal offices.

Previously for ODNR, she served as chief of communications, implementing strategic communications and marketing initiatives for one of Ohio’s largest state agencies.

McCorkle also has served as a communications and a marketing officer for the Ohio Department of Development, where she worked with national and local media to highlight department efforts and initiatives. Before that, she spent a number of years in the private sector, most recently as a director at Worldwide Express.

McCorkle has a bachelor’s degree from Bowling Green State University. She currently heads the Public Outreach Committee for the Worthington School PTA.

Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost (11)

Carrie Bartunek

External Affairs Director

Carrie Bartunek, director of external affairs and senior policy adviser for Attorney General Dave Yost, manages the office’s external relations and outreach efforts, overseeing its regional liaisons across the state.

Bartunek previously worked for eight years for then-State Auditor Yost, first as communications director and then as senior policy adviser for external affairs. In those roles, she handled media relations and both internal and external communications.

Her experience in communications, media relations, publications and event coordination spans more than 30 years, primarily covering city and state government, law enforcement and K-12 education.

Bartunek holds a bachelor’s degree in journalism from The Ohio State University.

Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost (12)

Glenn Sheller

Senior Special Projects Director

As senior special projects director, Glenn Sheller writes speeches and op-eds, conducts policy research, and reports and writes special reports on topics designated by Attorney General Dave Yost.

Sheller previously filled a similar role for Yost at the Auditor of State’s Office, in addition to serving as editor for the office’s Performance Audit Section.

Before that, he spent more than 30 years in newspaper journalism, as a reporter, copy editor, editorial writer, columnist and editor. He worked at the Springfield (Ohio) News-Sun, The York (Pennsylvania) Daily Record, The York (Pennsylvania) Dispatch/Sunday News and The Columbus Dispatch. For the final 14 years of his newspaper career, he served as editorial page editor of The Dispatch.

(Video) Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost Calls for Full-Court Press on Predators

Sheller holds a bachelor’s degree in journalism from The Ohio State University.

FAQs

How do I contact Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost? ›

Call (800)282-0515 to file your complaint.

Does Dave Yost have children? ›

Yost and his wife Darlene live in Franklin County, Ohio. They have three children and three grandchildren.

What kind of debt does the Ohio Attorney General collect? ›

Under Ohio Revised Code section 131.02, all delinquent state debt is collected by the Attorney General.

Who is the current Ohio attorney general? ›

Home - Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost.

What happens when you file a complaint with the Attorney General Ohio? ›

Typically, after receiving your complaint, a specialist will attempt to resolve the dispute by working with you and the business. The specialist will send an initial letter to the business asking the business to respond. From there, the specialist will try to help you and the business reach an agreed-upon resolution.

What can Ohio attorney general do? ›

The Ohio Attorney General's Legal Community

The office's work brings criminals to justice, preserves Ohioans' rights and protects the interests of state government and the citizens it serves. The office also provides formal opinions on legal questions arising during the course of public officials' work.

Where is David Yost coach? ›

David Yost - Offensive Coordinator/QBs - Football Coaches - Utah State University Athletics.

Who is the Ohio Assistant Attorney General? ›

Shawn Busken. Shawn Busken assists the first assistant attorney general with all legal and investigatory work of the Attorney General's Office, monitors the execution of office decisions and oversees special projects assigned by Attorney General Yost. He also serves simultaneously as director of outside counsel.

How do I request public records in Ohio? ›

Go Above and Beyond the Law:
  1. Write the kind of request letter that you would like to receive. ...
  2. Try to deliver request to the records officer or other “person responsible for public records.”
  3. Offer to discuss terms or scope of request.
  4. Ask what would make it more convenient or least burdensome for the office.
1 Jul 2018

How do I settle a debt with the Ohio attorney general? ›

An applicant must pay within 60 days of accepting the offer in compromise. If needed, a payment plan can be arranged by calling the Attorney General's Office at (614) 752-2211. What is an offer in compromise? An offer in compromise allows a person who owes the state money to negotiate less than the balance owed.

How long can a debt be collected in Ohio? ›

According to Debt.org, the statute of limitations on debt in Ohio is six years. This is the case regardless of what type of debt a person amasses, ranging from credit card debt to mortgage debt to tax debt.

What debt collectors Cannot do? ›

They cannot swear, threaten to illegally harm you or your property, threaten you with illegal actions, or falsely threaten you with actions they do not intend to take. They also cannot make repeated calls over a short period to annoy or harass you. Debt collectors cannot make false or misleading statements.

Who is special counsel to the Ohio attorney general? ›

Special Counsel Appointments - Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost.

What does a state attorney general do? ›

They represent the State in all lawsuits and transactions for and against the State.

How do you file a complaint against a company? ›

File a complaint with your local consumer protection office or the state agency that regulates the company. Notify the Better Business Bureau (BBB) in your area about your problem. The BBB tries to resolve your complaints against companies.

Does Ohio have a consumer protection agency? ›

Consumer Protection works to protect Ohio consumers by conducting local and state investigations and by joining multi-state and federal investigations.

How do I know if I owe the Ohio attorney general? ›

NOTE: For information on paying a tax debt or other debt owed to the state of Ohio, please contact the Attorney General's Collections Enforcement Section online or by calling 877-607-6400.

What are my civil rights in Ohio? ›

It is the right that all people are protected from discrimination in employment regardless of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, or mental or physical disability.

Does the Ohio Attorney General enforce state laws? ›

The office also enforces state and federal antitrust laws, helping to ensure that Ohio residents and local governments alike can operate within a fair and competitive marketplace. For example: BCI Science School. DRAM Settlement for Governmental Entities.

How do I file a complaint against a local government? ›

Contact the law enforcement agency involved. Submit your complaint in writing to the chief of police or the head of the law enforcement agency involved. Send a copy of your complaint to the Internal Affairs Division of the law enforcement agency. Be sure to keep a copy for yourself.

Did Texas Tech fire their coach? ›

Texas Tech football coach Matt Wells has been fired after two-plus seasons in charge. Athletic director Kirby Hocutt said in a Monday afternoon news conference that he met with Wells that morning, conceding that Wells was surprised and "didn't agree with the decision."

How much does the attorney general of Ohio make? ›

The average salary earned by U.S. governors was $128,735.
...
State executive salaries.
Office and current officialSalary
Attorney General of Ohio Dave Yost$109,985
Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose$60,584/year
Ohio Superintendent of Industrial Compliance and Labor Geoff Eaton
Ohio Auditor of State Keith Faber
5 more rows

Who appoints the Ohio attorney general? ›

The voters of the U.S. state of Ohio elect an attorney general for a four-year term.

Who is the US attorney in Ohio? ›

Kenneth L.

Parker was sworn in on November 23, 2021, as the 45th United States Attorney for the Southern District of Ohio. President Joseph Biden nominated Parker on September 28, 2021, and the United States Senate unanimously approved his confirmation on November 19, 2021.

What is the Sunshine law in Ohio? ›

Ohio's "Sunshine Laws" give residents access to government meetings and records. Ohio's Public Records Act and Open Meetings Act, also known as "Sunshine Laws," create an open government and help residents observe and take part in government meetings and activities and access records.

How do I find public records for free? ›

Visit the official website of the county, state, federal government, or court which is relevant to your background check. Search for public records in the online database of the website and make sure to enter the full name of the person whose records you are looking for in order to get accurate results.

What records are public in Ohio? ›

What is a "public record"? A public record means any records kept by any public office, except those records that are otherwise identified as exempt under the Ohio Public Records Act or the release of which is prohibited by state or federal law. Ohio Revised Code § 149.011(G):

How do I find out how much I owe Ohio attorney general? ›

NOTE: For information on paying a tax debt or other debt owed to the state of Ohio, please contact the Attorney General's Collections Enforcement Section online or by calling 877-607-6400.

How do I file a complaint against a local government? ›

Contact the law enforcement agency involved. Submit your complaint in writing to the chief of police or the head of the law enforcement agency involved. Send a copy of your complaint to the Internal Affairs Division of the law enforcement agency. Be sure to keep a copy for yourself.

Who is special counsel to the Ohio attorney general? ›

Chief Counsel and Ethics Officer

Bridget Coontz advises the Attorney General's Office on legal matters and litigates cases on its behalf. She also advises AGO staff regarding their ethical obligations under Ohio law, the Rules of Professional Conduct, and office policies and procedures.

Where is CRN or DRL Ohio attorney general? ›

CRN or DRL (This can be found on your letter from the Ohio Attorney General's office.)

Can you dispute a debt if it was sold to a collection agency? ›

Yes, but again the debt collector will be allowed to continue debt collection activities and will not have to verify the debt. If you want to assert your right to verify the debt, you must send your dispute letter within 30 days of receiving notice of the debt from the debt collector.

How do I deal with debt collectors if I can't pay? ›

5 ways to deal with debt collectors
  1. Don't ignore them. Debt collectors will continue to contact you until a debt is paid. ...
  2. Get information on the debt. ...
  3. Get it in writing. ...
  4. Don't give personal details over the phone. ...
  5. Try settling or negotiating.
18 Jan 2022

Can debt collectors sue you? ›

Can a debt collector sue you? Yes, it's possible to be sued by a debt collector, typically when you're at least 180 days delinquent on your account. When this happens, it's important to act carefully but proactively.

How do you make a complaint? ›

An effective complaint often has three steps: explaining the problem; stating your feelings; and asking for action. The first step is to explain the problem. To do it effectively, you must use polite, respectful language.

What is government ombudsman? ›

An ombudsman is an official, usually appointed by the government, who investigates complaints (usually lodged by private citizens) against businesses, financial institutions, universities, government departments, or other public entities, and attempts to resolve the conflicts or concerns raised, either by mediation or ...

What is the difference between complaint and complain? ›

Complaints is a noun. It mean "the expressions of discomfort, unease, pain, or grief." Complains is the third-person singular form of the verb "complain." It means "to express unease or discomfort, to lament."

Who appoints the Ohio attorney general? ›

The voters of the U.S. state of Ohio elect an attorney general for a four-year term.

What does a state attorney general do? ›

They represent the State in all lawsuits and transactions for and against the State.

Can a lien be placed on my house for a spouse's debt in Ohio? ›

If you bought a house after you married, the home is considered community property, even if your name is on the title and your money built up the equity. Because it's a joint asset, your spouse's creditors can put a lien on the house for his or her debt.

Why am I getting a letter from Ohio Department of Taxation? ›

2 Why am I receiving an Ohio Income Tax Refund Offset letter? The agency or agencies shown on the letter have reported to the Department of Taxation that you owe one or more debts. The Department is required to apply your Ohio income tax refund as partial or complete payment of the debt(s).

Can the Ohio attorney general take my federal taxes? ›

Yes. The State of Ohio retains the right to offset any monies owed to the applicant, including federal and state tax refunds. Will the Attorney General cease garnishment, foreclosure and other collection activities while an offer is pending?

Videos

1. Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost on 'new developments' concerning HB 6, bribery case
(WKYC Channel 3)
2. Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost looks back on 2021
(WBNS 10TV)
3. Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost on Policy: Prescription Drugs
(ohiobar)
4. Updates in officer-involved incidents in Cleveland and Columbus: Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost
(WKYC Channel 3)
5. Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost Announces Success of Statewide Anti-Human Trafficking Operation
(Ohio Attorney General)
6. Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost on seeking reelection instead of running for U.S. Senate
(NBC4 Columbus)
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